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Benefits of Juicing: Myth or Reality?

Many believe that juicing is healthier than eating whole vegetables and fruits as your body can better absorb the nutrients. Furthermore, your digestive system doesn’t have to digest the fiber present in vegetables and fruits. Read Flo’s article to learn everything about the benefits of juicing.

Juicing is the process of extracting juice from raw vegetables and fruits. The juice contains the majority of the minerals, phytonutrients (plant chemicals), and vitamins present in the raw fruits and vegetables.

Eating fresh vegetables and fruits enhances your health and also contributes to preventing the occurrence of several chronic health conditions including cancer, stroke, and ischemic heart disease.

There hasn’t been any confirmed evidence about whether consuming fruit and vegetable juice provides similar benefits as consuming whole vegetables and fruits or causes weight loss.

Vegetables and fruits are a rich source of a wide variety of vital nutrients including magnesium, potassium, folate, dietary fiber, and vitamins C and A, and a range of bioactive ingredients.

Because they have a high nutritional value, vegetables and fruits are frequently recommended by various health authorities around the globe. Furthermore, a vital goal of public health is to increase their consumption. According to the recommendations by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) 2015–2020, consuming vegetables and fruits forms a part of healthful eating

Vegetables and fruits are a rich source of a wide variety of vital nutrients including magnesium, potassium, folate, dietary fiber, and vitamins C and A, and a range of bioactive ingredients.

According to the recommendations by ChooseMyPlate, half of the food on your plate should be vegetables and fruits. Moreover, adults should eat 1.5–2 cups of fruit every day depending on your physical activity, gender, and age. MyPlate and DGA suggest that one cup of 100 percent fruit juice can be considered the same as one cup of fresh fruits, and 100 percent fruit juice in a moderate amount may form a part of healthful eating.

Scientists are debating the recommendations around 100 percent fruit juice, though. There are concerns that 100 percent fruit juices contain natural sugars that may lead to weight gain, similar to beverages containing added sugars. This concern is especially around children who drink 100 percent fruit juice.

According to some people, drinking juice is a better option than eating whole vegetables and fruits because your body can better absorb the nutrients. Moreover, the body doesn’t have to digest the fiber present in vegetables and fruits.

There are concerns that 100 percent fruit juices contain natural sugars that may lead to weight gain, similar to beverages containing added sugars.

However, there’s not enough scientific evidence to prove that juices from fresh vegetables and fruits have more health benefits than the juice you obtain by consuming whole vegetables and fruits.

Whole vegetables and fruits also contain healthy dietary fiber that is lost when you only drink the juice.

In this situation, one of the benefits of juicing is to consume juice when you have to reduce your intake of dietary fiber. Whole fruits and juices don’t have to be opposites; you can consume them in different situations.

Replacing your meals with juices isn’t a good diet plan because juice by itself isn’t balanced nutritionally and doesn’t have enough fat or protein.

There isn’t enough evidence to prove the benefits of a juice cleanse or its effectiveness at detoxifying the body. Moreover, consuming juices may harm people with kidney problems or taking certain medicines. For people with kidney issues, consuming a lot of juice containing oxalate is associated with kidney failure.

Replacing your meals with juices isn’t a good diet plan because juice by itself isn’t balanced nutritionally and doesn’t have enough fat or protein.

While considering juicing benefits for health, one of the major factors is that juices are rich in vitamin C, polyphenols, and carotenoids. Polyphenols are one of the important components of juices and are highly associated with their overall antioxidant activity. A high amount of vitamin C is linked to a variety of health benefits. By consuming juices, you can increase your intake of vitamin C substantially.

One hundred percent fruit juice doesn’t produce a significant effect on the levels of your blood sugar or insulin resistance.

One of the benefits of juicing is that it can help you add fruits and vegetables to your diet if you don’t like eating them.

When you’re making juice from vegetables and fruits, only make as much as you can drink immediately, as harmful bacteria can grow rapidly in freshly produced juice.

You can also consider blending the vegetables and fruits instead of extracting the juice. Blending the edible portions of vegetables and fruits produces a drink that contains more fiber and phytonutrients than juice. Dietary fiber can also help you feel full.

When you’re making juice from vegetables and fruits, only make as much as you can drink immediately, as harmful bacteria can grow rapidly in freshly produced juice. If you are buying commercially manufactured fresh juice, always select juice that is pasteurized.

Juicing is the process of squeezing out fresh juice from whole vegetables and fruits. A wide variety of important antioxidants and vitamins are present in fresh juices that are beneficial for your health. One of the benefits of juicing is that your digestive system doesn’t have to digest fiber. However, fresh vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious and healthiest when you consume them whole.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/juicing/faq-20058020

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6836193/

https://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(17)30863-6/fulltext

https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/eathealthy/fruits

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6836193/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6786897/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23830537-oxalate-nephropathy-due-to-juicing-case-report-and-review/

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