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    How to get pregnant with twins: Myths surrounding twin conception

    Updated 16 October 2023 |
    Published 22 November 2018
    Fact Checked
    Medically reviewed by Dr. Allison K. Rodgers, Reproductive endocrinologist, infertility specialist, obstetrician, and gynecologist, Fertility Centers of Illinois, Illinois, US
    Written by Olivia Cassano
    Flo Fact-Checking Standards

    Every piece of content at Flo Health adheres to the highest editorial standards for language, style, and medical accuracy. To learn what we do to deliver the best health and lifestyle insights to you, check out our content review principles.

    There are lots of myths surrounding how to get pregnant with twins and what might increase your odds. Here’s the lowdown on twin conception. 

    Key takeaways

    • The thought of having twins might fill you with excitement or fear. However, if twins don’t run in your family, then it’s unlikely that you’ll have them — but not impossible.
    • Fraternal (nonidentical) twins are a lot more common than identical twins and other types of multiple pregnancies
    • Studies have suggested that factors like your ethnicity and weight may affect the chances of conceiving twins.
    • Like so much of pregnancy, there are also a lot of myths surrounding twin conception, including that your diet, breastfeeding, and male fertility could impact your chances of having twins.

    What are the odds of having twins? 

    There aren’t any medically proven ways to intentionally get pregnant with twins. However, whether you’re pregnant or not, you may have found yourself wondering what your chances of having twins are in the future. Twin pregnancies are still fairly rare, with twin births only making up about 3% of all births in the United States. However, it absolutely isn’t impossible. 

    Having twins is more common than it was in the past. Over the last 40 years, the number of twin births has increased by a third. Experts believe this might be partially related to the fact that more people are having babies later in life, and fertility treatments have advanced so much over the last few decades.