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    How long does ovulation last?

    Updated 16 January 2023 |
    Published 17 January 2023
    Fact Checked
    Dr. Renita White
    Medically reviewed by Dr. Renita White, Obstetrician and gynecologist, Georgia Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgia, US
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    Whether you’re trying to conceive, or simply want to understand your own body, it can be helpful to know when you’re ovulating. We take a closer look at how long ovulation lasts and some of the symptoms you might experience.

    Ovulation is just a small moment in time, but it can mean big things for you and your body. Whether you’re fertility tracking and looking to conceive or simply want to know more about your cycle, understanding how long ovulation lasts and when it falls can be invaluable.

    Are you keen to get informed on all things ovulation? Here, Dr. Amanda Kallen, a reproductive endocrinologist and associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive endocrinology at Yale University School of Medicine, US, talks us through a typical ovulation time frame.   

    Flo can tell you when you're likely to be ovulating

    What is ovulation?

    First up: What is ovulation? In a nutshell, it’s the part of your menstrual cycle when one of your ovaries releases an egg. Once it’s released, the egg moves down into one of your fallopian tubes, where it can survive for about 24 hours. This can result in pregnancy if the egg gets fertilized by sperm during that time. And if it doesn’t? The egg will break down within 24 hours, and eventually this, along with the lining of your uterus (known as the endometrium), will shed when you have your period.  

    How long does ovulation last?

    Dr. Kallen says that “the whole process takes about 36 hours.” The moment you actually ovulate is instant, but the mechanisms that start ovulation are in full swing before that happens. That brings us onto … 

    When does ovulation occur in the menstrual cycle?

    Good question! “