1. Your cycle
  2. Sex
  3. Sexual health

Sex and Menstrual Cycle: Are They Connected?

Can your menstrual cycle change after being sexually active? Today we’re answering this and a few other questions related to sex and your cycle.

Many specialists associate changes in sex drive with fluctuations in the ratio of estrogen and progesterone — the hormones produced in the ovaries.

A boost in estrogen can lead to increased libido before period, while boosted progesterone leads to a lower sex drive.

These parameters fluctuate at different phases of the menstrual cycle.

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During menstruation and a few days after it, the concentration of both hormones is low, which can cause a decrease in sexual desire.

By the time of ovulation, your estrogen levels go up, reaching their peak, which is why your libido will normally get more intense during this period.

Ovulation is followed by an increase in progesterone production, which may lead to a drop in your sex drive.

Menstrual cycle duration varies for every woman. Does it depend on the frequency of sexual intercourse?

To answer this question, a number of studies were conducted in the United States in the 1970s.

They involved women with different sexual frequencies, who didn’t use hormonal contraceptives or intrauterine devices and got their first period at least 7 years before the studies.

It turned out that among the respondents who had sex regularly, the menstrual cycle duration mostly ranged from 26–33 days (29.5 days on average).

This duration is considered the most favorable for conception since such cycles are usually ovulatory.

In women having irregular sex, the menstrual cycle duration ranged on a wider scale; very short or very long cycles, which are usually anovulatory, were observed more often than those in the group having more regular sex.

After becoming sexually active, some girls may notice that their menstrual cycles have changed.

Indeed, sex can cause changes in the body. The key role is played by orgasm.

It triggers the release of a large amount of oxytocin.

This is not mandatory for conception, but necessary for regulating female hormone fluctuations, reducing stress, and managing the menstrual cycle.

Sexual activity also changes the levels of various hormones that affect the cycle, making it regular and the premenstrual syndrome symptoms less pronounced.

https://www.athenainstitute.com/sciencelinks/sexualbehaviorfrequency1979.html

http://www.newhealthadvisor.com/Does-Having-Sex-Affect-Your-Period.html

http://www.scarleteen.com/article/advice/can_sexual_activity_alter_your_period

https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/teens/ask-experts/does-sex-delay-your-period

http://www.13.waisays.com/clitoral.htm

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/oct/15/how-period-affects-sex-drive-menstruation-ovulation


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