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Female Orgasm: Everything You Wanted to Know, but Were Afraid to Ask

Orgasm is not just about pleasure. It is also an important aspect of women’s health as it triggers the release of the hormones, which help the body relax, reduce stress, help fight depression, and offer opportunities for full physical and mental development. Find out everything you need to know about this important function of your body below!

There are three major types of female orgasm: clitoral, vaginal, and blended.

The clitoral orgasm is the most common. 75% of women need clitoral stimulation to reach orgasm. Vaginal orgasm means that a woman can reach orgasm without clitoral stimulation. Most often this is through vaginal penetration. The latest research, however, suggests that vaginal orgasm is nothing but a myth since the vagina itself is anatomically incapable of producing an orgasm.

Women describe the most pleasurable experiences to involve a combination of vaginal and clitoral orgasm. Also included in the list is the “multiple” variety: when the woman experiences several orgasms in a row within a short time.

It seems that the last two types are rare, and only a few are able to experience.

The G-spot was discovered in 1950 by German gynecologist Ernst Gräfenberg, but its existence still causes arguments.

Some believe that it’s an extension of the clitoris. Others think the hype around this topic is beneficial only to the manufacturers of sex toys.

It’s believed that the G-spot is located on the front wall 0.8–1.2 in (2–3 cm) away from the vagina entrance. By touch, it’s a rough button and pressing on it may cause a full bladder sensation. But after a while, this feeling will disappear.

In certain positions, the G-spot stimulation can give you intense sensations. About 30% of women say that vaginal orgasm and pelvic muscle contractions are achieved by the stimulation of the G-spot during sex.

According to a study, about 33 percent of women have never experienced an orgasm. The causes of anorgasmia are divided into two groups.

Psychological: 
  • excessive control over emotions, inability to “disconnect”
  • low self-esteem, fear of doing something wrong
  • fear of getting pregnant
  • negative first sexual experience
  • psychological trauma
  • stress
Physiological:
  • hormonal disorders
  • malfunctioning of the nervous and cardiovascular systems
  • taking medications (especially antidepressants)

In general, anorgasmia treatment is determined by the cause of the problem. Sometimes, it is enough to try a new position or focus more on foreplay to a climax. Reading articles about it also helps, isn't it?

The lack of orgasm is considered normal at the beginning of one’s sex life, when female sexuality is awakening. In all other cases, it might be a female orgasmic disorder and an occasion to consult a doctor.

All medications tend to have side effects, and antidepressants are no exception. Taking antidepressants may cause weight gain, nausea, or dizziness, but an overriding concern is low libido. Why does this happen?

Antidepressants work in the following way: they raise the level of serotonin, thereby bringing a sense of calm and relaxation. At the same time, this very feeling blocks the hormones responsible for arousal and prevents them from influencing certain structures of the brain.

Low libido comes with a reduced production of natural lubrication, as well as delayed or blocked orgasm.

Undoubtedly, each person reacts differently to antidepressants’ sexual side effects, and the severity of them varies from case to case. Since antidepressants practically always provoke sexual issues, do not be ashamed if you feel like you have been affected by it. Talk with your partner and your doctor to determine the proper course of action.

Stimulating the sex organs is the most popular, but not the only way to reach an orgasm. Some adult women orgasm, for example, by their nipples being rubbed. It has been proven that in this case, the same brain area is aroused. One can experience orgasm while sleeping, having one’s hair cut, performing physical exercise, listening to music, watching racy movies, or even just by the power of thought!

However, it should be noted that such methods are more of an exception rather than a rule. Don't read too much into this. Only a small percentage of women are able to do it, and this is dependent on the emotional state and physiological characteristics of the woman.

Multiple orgasm means having several orgasms during one intercourse. For many women, multiple orgasms are achievable but not all are able to use this ability. Getting there requires effort and practice.

First, you need a psychological setup. It is important to be attuned to the idea that such pleasure is available to you. You also need to learn to listen to your body and explore your erogenous zones.

Continuous arousal is one of the main conditions for achieving real multiple orgasms. Here, a lot depends on the partner. Your partner should continue caressing you after your first orgasm.

Often after orgasm, both the vagina and the penis become sensitive and further touch becomes painful. In this case, one can stimulate other erogenous zones (the clitoris, the G-spot, the chest, the neck, etc.). To reach multiple orgasms, the sensitivity of the vagina is important. You can increase it by doing Kegel exercises to train the vaginal muscles.

According to studies, a woman will experience her most intense orgasm only by the time she’s 35. It is believed that at this age, she has sufficient self-knowledge, confidence, and sexual experience. That is everything needed for maximum pleasure during sex.

That's why thirty-year-old women have more frequent and vivid orgasms than younger people. However, sensations do not end there. Studies show that with the age gap, the sexual life of women becomes less intense but more sensual.

Contrary to stereotypes, the strongest orgasms come after menopause. This is associated with the desire to live for one’s self, without inhibition or fear of unwanted pregnancy.

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2262/the-g-spot/

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/anorgasmia/basics/causes/con-20033544?p

http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/causes-of-orgasm-problems-in-women.aspx?CategoryID=118&

https://sexualmed.org/known-issues/female-orgasmic-disorder/


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