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    Does cranberry juice help a UTI? What you should know

    Published 13 June 2022
    Fact Checked
    Medically reviewed by Dr. Sarina Schrager, Family physician and professor of family medicine and community health, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wisconsin, US
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    Every piece of content at Flo Health adheres to the highest editorial standards for language, style, and medical accuracy. To learn what we do to deliver the best health and lifestyle insights to you, check out our content review principles.

    Cranberry juice has gained a reputation for soothing the discomfort associated with UTIs. But is this a health hack or myth? A urologist explains it all.

    The constant need to pee, a burning sensation when you do make it to the toilet, and pelvic cramping and pain are all symptoms associated with urinary tract infections (UTIs). So it’s not surprising that we’re all looking for a quick way to relieve the discomfort.

    Drinking cranberry juice has long been hailed as an at-home remedy for UTIs. But does a glass of cranberry juice really help UTIs? Or is it a myth? And if not, how and why does cranberry juice help a UTI? 

    Below, a urologist explains exactly what UTIs are, the symptoms associated with them, and why cranberry juice has been linked to UTIs. 

    It’s important to note that if you start to experience any of the symptoms associated with UTIs, you should speak to your health care provider rather than trying to treat it yourself. It’s crucial to get the care you need. 

    What is a UTI?

    When you hear the term UTI, you might automatically think of a bladder infection (also known as cystitis). However, UTI is just a term used to describe a range of different infections anywhere in your urinary tract. And they’re very common.

    If you’ve ever had a UTI, you’re not alone. Research has highlighted that they’re one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections women face, with 50% to 60% of us experiencing one in our lifetime. In fact, it’s estimated that around 20% to 30% of young women have recurrent UTIs (this is when you experience two or more UTIs within a six-month period or three within a year). 

    Dr. Tolulope Bakare, MD, urologist and Flo medical board member, says, “A UTI is just an infection of the urinary system, anywhere from the bladder to the tubes connecting the kidneys, which are called the ureter, to the kidney itself — and even in the little tracts that empty the bladder, called the urethra.”

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