1. Getting pregnant
  2. Trying to conceive
  3. Signs of pregnancy

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Implantation Timing, Signs, and Symptoms

The moment when sperm meets an egg is known as fertilization, and it happens in one of the fallopian tubes. After fertilization, the fertilized egg travels towards the uterine lining, where it attaches and begins to grow. When does implantation begin? What are its signs? Read on to find out more.

Fertilization is when a viable egg fuses with viable sperm. It occurs in one of the fallopian tubes. After fertilization, the fertilized egg cell continues to divide and forms a cluster of cells. This cluster of cells travels toward and attaches itself in the uterine lining, and then it starts to grow. The implantation of a fertilized egg usually happens about 6 to 10 days after conception.

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Implantation of a fertilized egg usually occurs about 6 to 10 days after conception. For a pregnancy to happen, the embryo needs to implant successfully into the uterine lining, which has become thicker for this purpose. When implantation occurs, the body releases a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which produces changes in the body to support an upcoming pregnancy. This is the hormone that causes pregnancy tests to deliver a positive result.

In some cases, one of the early signs of implantation and pregnancy is light bleeding or spotting. This light spotting is known as implantation bleeding, and it happens when the fertilized egg attaches to the uterine lining, about 6 to 10 days after conception. Not all women experience implantation bleeding.

Implantation may come with cramps that occur when the fertilized egg attaches to the uterine lining.

Implantation bleeding is completely normal. Because of your cycle, implantation bleeding often shows up around the time you’d expect to start your period. However, implantation bleeding is lighter than typical menstrual bleeding.

Bleeding from implantation is light, doesn’t require treatment, and stops by itself.

Implantation may also come with cramps that occur when the fertilized egg attaches to the uterine lining. You may develop cramps in your abdomen, pelvis, or lower back.

Different women experience different symptoms of pregnancy. Some women experience every common symptom of pregnancy, while some have only a few or none at all.

If your period is late by one or more weeks, it may be an indication that you’re pregnant. However, a missed period doesn’t necessarily indicate pregnancy in all cases. Irregular menstrual cycles are very common and can happen for lots of reasons, including taking certain medicines and having medical issues such as polycystic ovary syndrome, eating disorders, or diabetes.

Some women experience every common symptom of pregnancy, while some have only a few or none at all.

Some early pregnancy symptoms include:

  • Swollen and tender breasts and nipples — You may experience this pregnancy symptom about one to two weeks after conception. The hormonal changes caused by pregnancy can make your breasts sore. They may also feel heavier or fuller than before.
  • Fatigue — This another early common pregnancy symptom. You may feel more fatigued and tired than usual as your body produces more progesterone, the hormone that helps maintain your pregnancy and promote the growth of milk-producing glands in your breasts. Your total blood volume also increases to provide nutrients to the growing fetus. You may notice fatigue about a week after conception.
  • Headaches — This symptom often occurs during early pregnancy due to a sudden increase in the level of hormones.
  • Nausea or/and vomiting — Both of these symptoms may begin about two to eight weeks after conception and may continue throughout your pregnancy. This symptom is commonly known as “morning sickness,” but it can strike at any time of the day.
  • Food aversions or cravings — A lot of women develop a sudden dislike for some foods or strong cravings for others throughout their pregnancy. This condition can remain for the entire pregnancy or keep changing throughout.
  • Mood swings — The hormonal changes during pregnancy can also cause intense mood swings. They usually start a couple of weeks after conception.
  • Frequent urination — In the early weeks of your pregnancy, your body secretes hCG. This hormone increases the blood flow to your pelvis, making you need to pee more frequently. These increased restroom visits may be persistent throughout your pregnancy. This is because your blood volume increases during this period, causing your kidneys to process more fluid, which ends up as urine.
  • Bloating — The hormonal changes of early pregnancy can make you feel bloated. This feeling is very similar to how you might feel at the beginning of your period.
  • Constipation — Again, thanks to hormones, your digestive system can slow down, which can cause constipation.
  • Nasal congestion — The increased hormones and blood volume can also cause your nasal mucous membranes to become swollen and more prone to bleeding.

Fertilization is when a viable egg fuses with viable sperm. It occurs in one of the fallopian tubes. After fertilization, the fertilized egg divides to form a mass of cells, which travels toward the uterus. In the uterus, this mass of cells implants into the thickened uterine lining and grows to form the fetus. Implantation typically occurs about 6 to 10 days after conception. 

After implantation, the body releases hCG, which produces the initial symptoms of pregnancy. A missed period is one of the primary signs of pregnancy, but you can also miss your period for several other reasons. If you miss your period, it might be a good idea to take a pregnancy test. Regardless of the results of the pregnancy test, visit your doctor to confirm your pregnancy or get to the bottom of what caused your missed or delayed period.   

https://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/How-Your-Fetus-Grows-During-Pregnancy?IsMobileSet=false

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5098399/#R12

https://www.acog.org/-/media/Departments/Government-Relations-and-Outreach/FactsAreImportantEC.pdf

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/getting-pregnant/in-depth/symptoms-of-pregnancy/art-20043853?pg=2

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/menstruation/conditioninfo

https://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq038.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20120731T1022269025

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/implantation-
bleeding/faq-20058257

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/pregnancy/conditioninfo/signs

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