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Does Masturbation Cause Acne?

Because masturbation isn’t often discussed openly, misinformation on the subject abounds. Many of us have learned that masturbating can cause acne. But is it true? In this article, we’ll explain why masturbation and acne aren’t as closely related as you may have been led to believe.

The misconception that masturbation causes acne has been around for a long time, but that doesn’t make it true. 

Masturbation is a perfectly normal thing to do, and in general, masturbation becomes more frequent during puberty, which is when a person’s hormone levels start to rise.

Those hormonal fluctuations also increase sebum production. Sebum is an oily substance that is secreted by the skin: it helps keep the skin hydrated and protected from bacteria and fungi. However, too much sebum can clog pores, causing acne and pimples. As a result, people may believe that because masturbation and acne begin at around the same age, masturbation is the cause of acne.

The answer is no, masturbation doesn’t cause acne. Acne is most frequently caused by hormone levels, and isn’t linked to masturbation. If acne becomes worse after masturbation, it’s simply a coincidence.

Masturbation does affect your hormonal levels, but only slightly. Both men and women experience a very small surge in testosterone after orgasm. However, studies have found that this increase is too small and too short to have any medical consequences, including acne.

Acne is most frequently caused by hormone levels, and isn’t linked to masturbation. If acne becomes worse after masturbation, it’s simply a coincidence.

In fact, some studies have even found that orgasms and masturbation can have a positive effect on your skin. Here are some of the ways in which masturbation can help your complexion:

  • Orgasms can make it easier to fall asleep. Acne has been linked to poor sleep quality, so improving your quality of sleep can help improve your skin.
  • Having an orgasm can also increase blood flow, which promotes healing.
  • Orgasm can also cause a slight increase in your estrogen levels. Estrogen is beneficial for skin and helps prevent premature aging and dehydration.

If masturbation and acne aren’t linked, what does cause acne?

There are many things that can cause acne or make it worse. The most common cause for facial acne is clogged pores. Skin is constantly producing sebum and shedding dead skin cells. Sometimes, these substances become trapped in the pores, which causes the clogged pores that can lead to blackheads, whiteheads, and pimples.

The most common cause for facial acne is clogged pores.

When you add bacteria into the mix, skin becomes inflamed and swollen. This can result in large, painful cysts. There are many types of bacteria that live on our skin, but we can get additional bacteria on our skin from touching the face, talking on the phone, resting against surfaces, and not washing our skin regularly.

Common risk factors for acne include:

  • Hormonal fluctuations
  • A diet high in refined carbohydrates and sugar
  • Certain medications, such as some types of birth control
  • A family history of acne
  • Stress
  • Some skincare products

Acne is a very common skin condition, and it affects millions of people around the world, especially teenagers. 

Developing a skincare routine that works for you can be a good step toward beating acne once and for all.

Fortunately, there are many things that you can do to prevent or relieve acne. Here are some tips for clearer skin:

  • Develop a skincare routine that works for you. Doing so can lead to clearer skin and also prevent premature skin aging, blemishes, and wrinkles in the long run.
  • Make sure to wash your face twice a day — in the morning and right before bed — to prevent excessive sebum and bacteria.
  • Use a toner that fits your skin type. A good toner can restore your skin’s pH balance, reduce pores, and hydrate your skin. There are toners available for each skin type, so make sure you choose the one that works for you.
  • Always wash your face after going to the gym or engaging in any other type of physical activity that causes sweating. Do not rub away sweat from your face during a workout. Sweat can increase your risk of developing pimples, rashes, and zits.
  • Over-the-counter acne treatments that contain salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, glycolic acid, or adapalene can reduce inflammation, kill bacteria, and stimulate new cell growth.
  • Identify and avoid skincare and makeup ingredients that can cause breakouts. Instead, choose products that are labeled noncomedogenic.
  • Change and wash your sheets and pillowcases regularly to prevent dirt and bacteria buildup.
  • Reduce your intake of foods that can cause inflammation, such as sugar and refined carbohydrates.
  • Drink plenty of water to keep your skin hydrated and help your body get rid of harmful toxins.
  • Wear sunscreen every day to prevent inflammation, sunburn, and hyperpigmentation.
  • Consider going to a dermatologist if over-the-counter treatments and lifestyle changes don’t work for you. There are many medical treatments available to fight acne, but they must be prescribed by a physician.

Masturbation can have many benefits, from relieving stress to promoting good sleep. Although many people believe that masturbation and acne are related, this is absolutely a myth. 

The only link between acne and masturbation is the increase in both during puberty for most people. However, this is nothing more than a coincidence. If you want to prevent or improve acne, follow a good skincare routine, eat a balanced diet, and try over-the-counter products meant to improve this condition.

https://www.facingacne.com/masturbation-acne/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5440448/#bb0010

https://www.dermnetnz.org/topics/sebum/

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0115/p366.html

https://www.aad.org/adult-acne

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