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Sex With a New Partner: Your Ultimate Guide

Having sex with someone new can be fun, exciting, and full of passion. But it’s also important to stay safe and communicate your needs and desires clearly. There are certain steps and considerations that can help make sex with a new partner pleasurable and safe.

So you’re feeling ready to have sex with a new guy (or girl, or person), but you’re not entirely sure of the steps you should take to make sure you’re being safe. Sex has many health benefits that can make you feel better both physically and emotionally. However, there are certain precautions that you and your partner need to take to have safe sex.

Safe sex isn’t just about avoiding sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or unwanted pregnancy. It’s also about making sure that both you and your partner communicate your expectations clearly, provide enthusiastic consent, and have an enjoyable experience. This may seem like a lot to do before having sex with a new person, but it’s all about communication, planning, and mutual respect.

Maintaining your physical health is one of the most important factors you need to consider before having sex with a new partner. Ideally, both you and your partner are tested for STIs before having sex for the first time. 

Some of the most common STIs that you should both get tested for include:

  • HIV
  • Gonorrhea
  • Syphilis
  • Chlamydia

Be aware of any abnormal signs on your partner’s body which can point to an STI. Common signs of different STIs include:

  • Vaginal or penile discharge
  • Genital swelling or redness
  • Blisters, sores, spots or lumps around the genitals or anus
  • Painful urination
  • Itching, burning, or tingling around the genitals 
  • Pain in the lower abdomen
  • Pain during sex
  • Genital warts

However, it’s possible to have an STI without exhibiting any symptoms! Someone could show absolutely no symptoms of an STI and still have one and pass it to others.

You should always remember that condoms are the only contraceptive method that protects you from STIs. Both external and internal condoms are great alternatives. Additionally, dental dams are like condoms for oral sex and can also provide protection from STIs.

If your new sex partner has HIV, you can ask your doctor for a prescription for pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. This is a combination of medications that can prevent HIV infection.

It’s very important to keep in mind that, with the proper precautions, it’s possible to have safe sex with a partner who has HIV. In fact, many people live with HIV-positive partners without any complications. Make sure that you use condoms and dental dams. 

If your new sex partner has HIV, you can ask your doctor for a prescription for pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. This is a combination of HIV medications that can prevent HIV infection.

Comfort is very important when you’re having sex with a new partner, and lubrication can make sex much more pleasurable. Sometimes lubricants can even help to prevent STIs: some data shows that condom breakage doesn’t occur as often during anal sex if additional appropriate lubricant is used. Not everyone requires extra lubricant, but it’s always a good idea to have some nearby.

If you’re using latex condoms, choose a lubricant that’s water or silicone-based.

You can experiment with different brands and products until you find something you both like. Lubricant can also help avoid vaginal, perineal, or anal tears.

Keep in mind that oil-based lubricants can degrade latex condoms (as well as polyisoprene ones, commonly used by people with latex sensitivity). If you’re using these condoms, choose a lubricant that’s water or silicone-based. Many condoms are already lubricated.

Great sex is more likely to happen if you have great communication. Before having sex, discuss your kinks, desires, and expectations. Everyone is different when it comes to sex, and it’s important to discuss what you like and what you don’t like.

Communication is critical for making sure both partners enjoy sex. It can also help you feel more connected to and safer with your partner.

Don’t be ashamed of talking about sex. Communication is critical for making sure both partners enjoy sex. It can also help you feel more connected to and safer with your partner. It’s important to discuss consent and boundaries when you’re having sex with a new person. Talking about this stuff only before or after sex might not be enough. You might need to communicate your feelings during sex itself, which is totally fine. 

Whether you’re in a new relationship, having fun, or dating multiple people, sex is nothing to be ashamed of. However, it’s important to know what your expectations are and how you’re feeling about yourself.

Ask yourself whether you feel safe with your new partner, and if you truly feel ready to have sex with them. Remember that even if you’ve already talked about having sex or initiated the act, you can always change your mind at any point. Sex is never an obligation.

Whether you’re in a new relationship, having fun, or dating multiple people, sex is nothing to be ashamed of.

You should also ask yourself how your new partner makes you feel. They should make you feel respected and valued, regardless of whether you’re in a relationship with them. 

It’s also important to ask your new partner about what they want and expect from sex. Knowing what they like can help you be a better sex partner and help them enjoy themselves, too.

There are many important questions you need to ask before having sex with someone new. These questions will make it easier for you to have safe, enjoyable sex:

  • When was the last time you got tested for STIs?
  • How many partners have you had in the past?
  • Have you ever been diagnosed with an STI? Do you currently have symptoms of an STI? 
  • Are you currently having sex with other people?
  • How do you feel about using dental dams during oral sex?
  • Would you be willing to update your STI tests before we have sex?
  • What do you like during sex?
  • Is there something you don’t like during sex?

Sex can be wonderful, healthy, and lots of fun as long as you’re being safe and communicating with the other person. It’s important to make sure that you’re both healthy before having sex with someone new, and you should also make sure to discuss your likes and dislikes. These are conversations that anyone who’s sexually active should be willing to have.

The best thing to do is to get tested for STIs before you have sex with a new partner. Even if your partner has an STI, it’s still perfectly possible to have safe and enjoyable sex. Factors like open communication, using condoms, discussing contraception, and keeping your preferences in mind can all make a big difference when you’re having sex with someone new.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/safer-sex-guidelines

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sexual-health/what-to-ask-your-partner-before-sex/

https://www.cdc.gov/std/prevention/screeningreccs.htm&sa=D&ust=1572857202693000&usg=AFQjCNG87p57RqQVzhCTYUkADi8V0f3egg

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sexual-health/

https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/76580/WHO_RHR_12.33_eng.pdf;jsessionid=8BCD3BFCBDB7C12
0E069438656613AE9?sequence=1

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