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Eczema on Hands: 5 Proven Ways to Beat It

If you have constantly itchy hands or peeling skin on your hands, you could be suffering from hand eczema. This condition causes several uncomfortable symptoms, but certain simple strategies can help you keep it under control. Let’s talk more about hand eczema.

Hand eczema is also known as hand dermatitis. Eczema is an inflammatory skin condition that can affect any part of your body. 

Hand eczema affects patches of skin, and its most common symptoms include:

  • Dry, chapped, sometimes flaky skin
  • Itchy fingers and hands
  • Scaly, rough skin
  • A burning sensation 
  • Blisters that are often itchy
  • Painful patches of skin
  • Cracked skin
  • Bleeding or weeping skin
  • Crusts, pus, and painful lesions

This condition isn’t contagious, and its exact cause isn’t known. Genetic factors could play a role in its development.

Eczema can affect your hands exclusively. You have a higher risk of developing hand eczema if you’re constantly working with your hands, washing them, or exposing them to chemical substances. 

A lot of people have found that certain foods, situations, and substances can make their hand eczema worse. Common eczema triggers include:

  • Stress and anxiety
  • Extreme temperatures
  • Hot water
  • Dry weather
  • Food allergies
  • Prolonged water exposure
  • Harsh laundry detergents
  • Perfumes and scented products
  • Pollution, mold, pollen
  • Dust mites
  • Certain fabric

Having dry patches of skin on your hands doesn’t automatically mean that you have hand eczema. There are many other skin conditions that can cause dry, itchy hands.

Dry skin occurs when the outer layer of your skin (the epidermis) is unable to produce enough sebum, an oily substance that hydrates and protects your skin. This is a skin type, rather than a skin condition, and it can lead to premature aging and excessive fine lines. These signs are usually more pronounced when you have dry skin on your face.

Unlike dry skin, eczema is often accompanied by symptoms such as rashes and blisters. Patients also tend to have a family history of eczema.

Eczema, on the other hand, is a more serious condition that can’t be treated with a simple moisturizer. Eczema needs to be diagnosed by a doctor. Unlike dry skin, eczema is often accompanied by symptoms such as rashes and blisters. Patients also tend to have a family history of eczema.

Additionally, eczema can affect any skin type, even oily skin. Oily skin can change according to your menstrual cycle, and these hormonal fluctuations can cause eczema flare-ups, too. 

Dyshidrotic eczema, also known as pompholyx, can cause small, itchy, painful blisters to appear on the palms of your hands or on your feet.

These are some of the most effective ways to manage eczema on your hands.

Skin irritants that frequently come into contact with our hands include:

  • Hand soap
  • Body washes
  • Scented lotions
  • Nail polish remover
  • Dish soap
  • Laundry detergent
  • Metals, especially nickel
  • Antibiotic solutions and ointments
  • Shampoo and conditioner
  • Disinfectant
  • Baby wipes
  • Products used to make crafts, such as glue
  • Citrus and other acidic fruit juices

It’s difficult to completely avoid many of these products, but you can minimize your exposure to them. For example, if you notice that you have eczema on your fingers, not wearing rings may help.

If you need to clean around the house and get your hands wet, protect them with cotton-lined vinyl gloves. If your hands get wet inside the gloves, remove them and dry your hands. If the problem persists, try to change gloves more frequently.

If you need to clean around the house, protect them with cotton-lined vinyl gloves. It’s also very important to wear gloves during the colder months.

You can wear soft cotton gloves when doing chores such as folding laundry, dusting the shelves, or gardening. Wear disposable gloves when you’re cooking. You can even wear gloves while shampooing your hair; just put a rubber band around your wrists to keep your hands dry.

It’s also very important to wear gloves during the colder months. You can apply hand moisturizer before you put on your gloves for added hydration.

A rich, oil-based, and fragrance-free moisturizer will work best for hand eczema. Make sure that you apply moisturizer on your hands several times a day. Moisturize your hands after taking a bath and every time you dry your hands after getting them wet. Keep your hands moisturized even if you aren’t currently experiencing eczema symptoms.

You can try applying petroleum jelly or another rich moisturizer before going to bed, and sleeping with soft gloves on to lock in the moisture. Moisturizing is also very important for aging skin.

Avoid soaps with an alkaline pH, scented or deodorant soaps, soaps that contain dyes, and industrial products.

Organizations such as The National Eczema Association (NEA) provide seals of approval for products that they recommend. You can try using one of these products, but keep in mind that everyone reacts differently to each product.

To manage eczema, avoid soaps with an alkaline pH, scented or deodorant soaps, soaps that contain dyes, and industrial products.

Once you’ve found a cleanser that doesn’t irritate your hands, make sure you always carry it with you. You can purchase small, travel-sized bottles and carry cleanser and moisturizer in your purse or gym bag.

Wash your hands using lukewarm — not hot — water. Then, pat your hands dry and apply moisturizer every time you wash your hands. Avoid antibacterial gels or other alcohol-based products.

Hand eczema may require medical treatment, and the condition should always be diagnosed by a doctor. Different degrees of eczema severity require different treatments, which can range from topical corticosteroids to oral medications.

Hand eczema may require medical treatment, and the condition should always be diagnosed by a doctor.

Phototherapy can also be an effective treatment for hand eczema. Your physician is the best person to recommend different treatments and lifestyle changes to improve your symptoms. 

Having eczema on your hands is no fun, but this condition can be managed through a combination of medical treatments and a change of habits. Simple techniques, such as switching to scent-free products and wearing gloves, can make a huge difference. It’s also important to drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration, which can only worsen your symptoms.

Avoid getting your hands wet and make sure you constantly apply an oil-based moisturizer to start improving your symptoms. Flare-ups can last a few weeks or months, but if you take good care of your hands consistently, chances are they’ll get better eventually.

https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/causes-and-triggers-of-eczema/

https://www.aad.org/hand-eczema

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4037938/

https://www.cochrane.org/CD004055/SKIN_treatments-hand-eczema

https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/eczema/treatment-16/eczema-hands-feet

https://www.cochrane.org/CD004055/SKIN_treatments-hand-eczema

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